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Opening minds...changing lives.

 At Mental Health America of the Triangle, we are very proud of our cost-effective programs and services, serving children, families, and individuals.

The Family Advocacy Network - supporting families, helping children. 

The Pro Bono Counseling Network - free counseling for those in pain, in need - providing hope. 

Compeer - harnessing "the healing power of friendship" to support people with severe and persistent mental health conditions.

The Orange Partnership for Alcohol and Drug Free Youth - educating, advocating - to keep our community safe. 

Because our programs are powered by dedicated, trained volunteers and professionals, your donation helps even more people living with mental illness.

Providing high quality, low cost services to those in need is a hallmark of our organization.

It is part of our mission that programs and services be offered for free to those in need.

Thousands of North Carolinians are uninsured or “underinsured” (accessing covered mental health services is unaffordable). We provide support and assistance to the people who reach out to us for help, despite their ability to pay.

With help, comes hope.

With your help, we can reach out and offer this support…and hope.

 

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You can help make a difference in the lives of those living with mental health challenges. 

Please click here for a printable tri-fold which tells some of our stories -

and shows the many ways that your gift makes a direct, life-changing difference!

Please donate today!


Education, Training, Activities & Support

Mental Health America of the Triangle offers a variety of education, training, and support for parents, providers and community members on an array of topics related to mental health and wellness throughout the year. The Family Advocacy Network offers parenting skills training, support groups and educational workshops for parents raising children with mental health, behavioral and learning challenges. The Pro Bono Counseling Network coordinates a continuing education series for mental health providers throughout the year. The Compeer program offers quarterly volunteer trainings and social activities. In addition, Mental Health America of the Triangle hosts community-wide events on special topics. Check back for the most current listings!

Upcoming Events | 

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Apr
09
An overview of the current state of science on risk factors, early detection and directions in autism research.
Apr
17
This session is part of the Pro Bono Counseling Network (PBCN) Education Series. It will be held at Cardinal Innovations Healthcare Solutions (OPC Community Operations Center), 201 Sage Road, Suite 300, Chapel Hill, NC 27514.
Apr
18
Where: William and Ida Friday Center, 100 Friday Drive, Chapel Hill, NC. The annual Schizophrenia Treatment and Evaluation Program (STEP) Symposium offers mental health professionals, advocates, individuals and families living with schizophrenia and other severe mental illnesses an annual learning opportunity focused on innovative treatment approaches.
Apr
18
Join us as we learn how to change aspects of our thinking so that we can create the lives we truly want to experience.

News | 

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FAN Expands Services to Latino Families

Raising a child who is suffering from mental illness is challenging enough. Yet, some Latino parents are also struggling with a language barrier that may prevent them from identifying and accessing important resources for their family. In an effort to bridge this gap, Mental Health America of the Triangle’s Family Advocacy Network (FAN) has expanded its services to support Latino parents.

Fact Sheets and Resources

Mental Health America:
Mental health Information by Topic
Fact Sheet on Suicide

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI):
Mental Illness Facts and Numbers

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Articles

Remembering Robin Williams: His Life Should Continue to Inspire Us 
by Paul Gionfriddo, President/CEO of Mental Health America

Robin Williams' Death Is a Wakeup Call for Mental Illness
by Jonathan Cohn, published in New Republic